Island Flavours – Personal Recipes from the Homes of Toronto Islanders

Island Flavours – Personal Recipes from the Homes of Toronto Islanders

Island Flavours – Personal Recipes from the Homes of Toronto Islanders

  • Drawings by:  Gail Read
  • Design by:  Gail Read and Anne Broecker
  • Date:  Dec 1976
  • Provenance:  from the collection of Nina Zhelka
  • Digitized by:  Eric Zhelka
  • Notes:
    RECIPES COLLECTED OVER THE YEARS BY THE TORONTO ISLAND RESIDENTS
    DRAWINGS © COPYRIGHT 1976 BY GAIL READ
    DRAWINGS MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT PERMISSION
    CELEBRATIONS BY ELIZABETH AMER
    DESIGN BY GAIL READ AND ANNE BROECKER
    A SPECIAL THANK YOU IS EXTENDED TO GREEY
    DE PENCIER PUBLISHERS, AND IN PARTICULAR, FOR
    THE GUIDANCE OF GREG BUTLER; TO BARBARA ROERICK
    FOR HER TYPING SKILLS, AND TO ALL THOSE WHO,
    FROM THE EARLY BEGINNINGS TO THE PRESENT REALITY,
    HAVE HELPED IN MAKING THIS BOOK.
    PUBLISHED BY THE IPS ISLAND HOME & SCHOOL ASSOCIATION
    PRINTED BY TRIANGLE GRAPHIC SERVICES,
    70 ADVANCE ROAD, TORONTO
    DECEM8ER 1976
    

    “Islanders have long been known for their gourmet meals. Anyone who has been fortunate enough to take the fabulous dishes that are served on GALA DAY must agree. Now you have an opportunity to try some of these mouth-watering recipes that have been treasured by many Islanders over the years. Here is a book full of tantalizing appetizers, hearty main courses, spectacular desserts and exciting fun foods with simple, easy-to-follow recipes. In addition, it is also a book full of sketches drawn by an Island artist Gail Read Labonte-Smith. These drawings will take you on a nostalgic tour through the Islands as you try your culinary skills with the many personal recipes listed in the book. Anyone who receives this cookbook will have something to retain forever as a fond reminder of the unique way of life that exists in the Island Community.”
    Ted Currie
    Principal
    Island Public School


The …

Toronto Purchase / Treaty 13, 1805 & 2010

Toronto Purchase / Treaty 13, 1805 & 2010

Documents: The Toronto Purchase (Treaty 13), 1805 & Toronto Purchase Specific Claim: Arriving at an Agreement

By: Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation

Date: 22-05-2008

Provenance: From http://mncfn.ca/torontopurchase/

[Ed: from Wikipedia:
Starting in 1986, the Mississaugas opened a land claims settlement process with the Government of Canada to rectify its grievance over the Toronto Purchase and a smaller plot of land near Burlington Bay. In 2010, Canada agreed to pay $145 million for the lands, based on the ancient value of the land, extrapolated to current dollars, thereby affirming the boundary of the treaty as laid out in the 1805 survey – which included the Toronto Islands.]

Treaty boundaries from 1805 survey
Toronto Purchase treaty boundaries (1805) and showing municipal boundaries

Fearing invasion from the new neighbours to the south (which came in 1812), the Crown felt it vital to secure a military communication route from Lake Ontarion to Lake Huron that did not utilize the vulnerable routes through Niagara, Lake Erie and past Detroit. In 1785, Lieutenant Governor Hamilton sent out John Collins, the Deputy Surveyor General, to explore the passage from the Bay of Quinte, up the Trent River to Lake Simcoe and then on to Lake Huron and to determine what lands would need to be purchased from the Mississaugas and Chippewas. Collins apparently went ahead and made “Treaties” with both the Mississaugas, for a right of passage, and with the Chippewas for land from Lake Simcoe to Lake Huron. The passage proved unsatisfactory and the Crown looked for a better route.

In 1787, Sir John Johnson, head of the Indian Department, called a council of the Mississaugas at the Bay of Quinte to distribute “presents” (trade goods such as blankets, kettles and gunpowder) to reward the Mississaugas for their loyalty to the British during the American Revolution. In total £1,700 worth of trade goods was distributed to all of the various Mississauga groups at three different locations across southern Ontario. At that Council, Sir John Johnson discussed a number of potential land sales along the north shore of Lake Ontario and in particular they discussed a potential purchase of the “carrying place” from Toronto to Lake Simcoe.

Although these discussions were later characterized as the “sale” of Toronto, and the £1,700 worth of presents were later characterized wrongly as payment for the Toronto Purchase, in actual fact, nothing was sold at the Council in 1787. The deed to the land that was “found” many years later was blank, with the marks of three Chiefs from the Toronto area on separate scraps of paper wafered onto the blank deed.

Although these discussions were later characterized as the “sale” of Toronto, and the £1,700 worth of presents were later characterized wrongly as payment for the Toronto Purchase, in actual fact, nothing was sold at that Council in 1787. The deed to the land that was “found” many years later was blank, with the marks of three Chiefs from the Toronto area on separate scraps of paper wafered onto the blank deed. There was no description of the land “sold” in the deed.

The only record which remains of the lands discussed in 1787 is contained in a letter written by Sir John Johnson twelve years after the fact in 1798:

ten miles  square at Toronto, and two to four Miles, I do not recollect which, on each side of the intended road or carrying place leading to Lake Le Clai (Lake Simcoe), then ten miles square at the Lake and the same square at the end of the water communication emptying into Lake Huron this deed was left with Mr. Collins, whose Clerk drew it up to have the courses inserted with survey of these Tracts were completed and was never returned to my office…

Map of the Toronto Purchase 1805

It is important to note that Sir Johnson considered the purchase to be “ten miles square.” He is not certain about the width of the strip up to Lake Simcoe, but he was clear that is was either two or four miles on either side of the Carrying Place.

It is also important to note that the boundaries of the land as discussed with Sir John Johnson and the Mississaugas did not include the Toronto Islands. “Ten miles square” at Toronto would not have captured what was then the Toronto peninsula (the Toronto Islands did not become islands until a great storm later in the 1800’s).

Click here to view the Toronto Purchase Specific Claim – Arriving at an Agreement booklet

Click here to view the Indian Claims Commission – Mississauga of the New Credit First Nation Inquiry – Toronto Purchase Claim

Please Walk on the People

Please Walk on the People

Please Walk on the People
Document: From an original copy of Toronto Life Magazine
Date of document: March, 1974?
Author article: Ron Haggart
Document provided by: Don Lomax, 204 Lakeshore
Provenance: From the collection of Ted English
Digitized by: Ted English

 

Save Island Homes Booklet

Save Island Homes Booklet

Document: “Save Island Homes” Booklet
Prepared and Published by: Toronto Island Residents Association (TIRA)
Author of text: Freya Godard
Date of document: April,1974
Designed & Printed at: The Coach House Press
Original document provided by: Elizabeth Amer with assistance of Peter Holt.
Provenance: From the collection of Ted English
Digitized by: Ted English

Joys of island Living

Joys of island Living

Joys of Island Living

Provenance: From the collection of Ted English
Digitize by: Ted English
Document: Publication not determined. (Name clip!) From an original page of document
Date of Document: Not determined –approximately 1968
Bi-line Don Cossley, Columnist
Notes: If anyone has knowledge of the suicide referred to in the article, please advise in “Comments.”

Joys of Island Life (1 of 2).pdf

Joys of Island Life (2 of 2).pdf